Fully working prototypes with Spring Boot and H2

We do use a lot of h2 with spring especially for unit tests. However instead of unit tests we might want to have a fully functional prototype with data to display.
H2 is the perfect candidate for that, it works great with spring, it has good syntax compatibility with most databases out there and it also provides you with a ui to check your data.

Imagine the scenario of an interview assignment. You want your example to work out of the box with as minimum as possible configuration for the reviewer.
The plan is to have an application up and running with some data.
Before accessing the application we might as well want to add some data to it. Then we need to have a proper way to display the data added without adding extra code.

The first step is to go to the spring initializr and add the Web and H2 dependencies. Also we shall add the jdbc property.

The end result will give a build.gradle file like this.

buildscript {
	ext {
		springBootVersion = '2.0.6.RELEASE'
	}
	repositories {
		mavenCentral()
	}
	dependencies {
		classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:${springBootVersion}")
	}
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'eclipse'
apply plugin: 'org.springframework.boot'
apply plugin: 'io.spring.dependency-management'

group = 'com.gkatzioura.springbooth2'
version = '0.0.1-SNAPSHOT'
sourceCompatibility = 1.8

repositories {
	mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
	implementation('org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-jdbc')
	implementation('org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web')
	runtimeOnly('com.h2database:h2')
	testImplementation('org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-test')
}

Since we added the jdbc property we can have some schema scripts executed once the application is started.
Thus we need to create a schema.sql file containing the sql statements which create the schema.

CREATE TABLE application_user (ID INT, USER_NAME VARCHAR(50), PASSWORD VARCHAR(255));
INSERT INTO application_user (ID,USER_NAME, PASSWORD) values (1,'test','password-hash');

The next step is to enable the h2 console. We will go with the yaml approach however you can do it either using a properties file or environmental variables.

spring:
  h2:
    console:
      enabled: true

Now once we get our spring application running we can navigate at the http://localhost:8080/h2-console endpoint.
We shall be presented with the default credentials needed

Once we have logged in, we can query for the user we had inserted on our startup sql script.

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 07.36.20.png

That’s it! This can make wonders for prototypes, interview assignments and blog posts like this!

SQL Data Access in Play using Scala

Today’s modern application frameworks come with a promise of easy sql data access. There is no wonder why we have so many frameworks that make it easier to issue queries and handle transactions. SQL is the lingua franca of most applications when it comes to databases.

Play comes with the JDBC plugin. We encountered the JDBC plugin previously in order to modify our database schema.

The first step is to include the jdbc and the evolutions module.

libraryDependencies += evolutions
libraryDependencies += jdbc

Then we shall define the connection string needed. We will use a simple h2 database. The configuration is added at the application.conf.

db.default.driver=org.h2.Driver
db.default.url="jdbc:h2:/tmp/defaultdatabase"

Then we add a script that creates the users table.

# Users schema

# --- !Ups

CREATE TABLE users (
    id bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    email varchar(255) NOT NULL,
    first_name varchar(255) NOT NULL,
    last_name varchar(255) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (id),
    UNIQUE KEY (email)
);

# --- !Downs

DROP TABLE users;

Before creating our repository class let’s check what the jdbc plugin provides us with.

We have the plain getConnection method, responsible for returning a jdbc connection. This is similar to the DataSource.getConnection from Java. Thus pay extra attention since you must close the connection.

val connection = db.getConnection()
connection.close()

Next method is withConnection. By using withConnection you get Play to manage the connection for you. All you have to do is pass a block of code with jdbc actions.

  def fetchUsers(): List[User] = {

    db.withConnection { conn =>

      val stmt = conn.createStatement
      var rs = stmt.executeQuery("SELECT*FROM users");
      val listBuffer = ListBuffer[User]()

      while(rs.next()) {

        listBuffer.append(User(Option(rs.getLong("id")),rs.getString("email"),rs.getString("first_name"),rs.getString("last_name")))
      }

      listBuffer.toList
    }
  }

As you can see above, we’ve just returned back a list of our user entries.

And last but not least withTransaction. You’ve guessed right, what you receive back is a connection with autocommit set to false.

  def addUser(user:User): User = {

    db.withTransaction { conn =>
      val stmt = conn.createStatement

      val insertQuery = "INSERT INTO users ( email, first_name, last_name) VALUES( '"+user.email+"', '"+user.firstName+"','"+user.lastName+"') "
      stmt.executeUpdate(insertQuery,Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS)
      val resultSet = stmt.getGeneratedKeys;
      if(resultSet.next()) {
        val id = resultSet.getLong(1);
        new User(Option(id),user.email,user.firstName,user.lastName)
      } else {
        throw new Exception("User not persisted properly")
      }
    }
  }

In the above example a user is persisted. In case of failure we throw an exception and the transaction is rolled back.

To sum up we have just checked how to access a sql database using play. Also we have checked the extra functions that play api provides apart from the familiar jdbc api.
That’s all for now! Feel free to check the code on github.

Spring Data with JPA and @NamedQueries

If you use Spring Data and @NamedQuery annotations at your JPA entity you can easily use them in a more convenient way using the spring data repository.

On a previous blog we created a spring data project using spring boot and docker. We will use the pretty same project and enhance our repository’s functionality.

We will implement a named query that will fetch employees only if their Last Name has as many characters as the ones specified.

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.entity;

import javax.persistence.*;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
@Entity
@Table(name = "employee", schema="spring_data_jpa_example")
@NamedQuery(name = "Employee.fetchByLastNameLength",
        query = "SELECT e FROM Employee e WHERE CHAR_LENGTH(e.lastname) =:length "
)
public class Employee {

    @Id
    @Column(name = "id")
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE)
    private Long id;

    @Column(name = "firstname")
    private String firstName;

    @Column(name = "lastname")
    private String lastname;

    @Column(name = "email")
    private String email;

    @Column(name = "age")
    private Integer age;

    @Column(name = "salary")
    private Integer salary;

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getFirstName() {
        return firstName;
    }

    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
    }

    public String getLastname() {
        return lastname;
    }

    public void setLastname(String lastname) {
        this.lastname = lastname;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public Integer getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(Integer age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public Integer getSalary() {
        return salary;
    }

    public void setSalary(Integer salary) {
        this.salary = salary;
    }
}

Pay extra attention to the query name and the convention we follow @{EntityName}.{queryName}.
Then we will add the method to our spring data repository.

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.repository;

import com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.entity.Employee;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;
import org.springframework.data.repository.query.Param;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Repository;

import java.util.List;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
@Repository
public interface EmployeeRepository extends JpaRepository<Employee,Long>, EmployeeRepositoryCustom {

    List<Employee> fetchByLastNameLength(@Param("length") Long length);
}

And last but not least add some functionality to our controller.

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.controller;

import com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.entity.Employee;
import com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.repository.EmployeeRepository;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestParam;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import java.util.List;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
@RestController
public class TestController {

    @Autowired
    private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

    @RequestMapping("/employee")
    public List<Employee> getTest() {

        return employeeRepository.findAll();
    }

    @RequestMapping("/employee/filter")
    public List<Employee> getFiltered(String firstName,@RequestParam(defaultValue = "0") Double bonusAmount) {

        return employeeRepository.getFirstNamesLikeAndBonusBigger(firstName,bonusAmount);
    }

    @RequestMapping("/employee/lastnameLength")
    public List<Employee> fetchByLength(Long length) {
        return employeeRepository.fetchByLastNameLength(length);
    }

}

You can find the source code on github.

Hibernate Caching with HazelCast: Basic configuration

Previously we went through an introduction on JPA caching, the mechanisms and what hibernate offers.

What comes next is a hibernate project using Hazelcast as a second level cache.

We will use a basic spring boot project for this purpose with JPA. Spring boot uses hibernate as the default JPA provider.
Our setup will be pretty close to the one of a previous post.
We will use postgresql with docker for our sql database.

group 'com.gkatzioura'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:1.5.1.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'org.springframework.boot'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web")
    compile group: 'org.springframework.boot', name: 'spring-boot-starter-data-jpa'
    compile group: 'org.postgresql', name:'postgresql', version:'9.4-1206-jdbc42'
    compile group: 'org.springframework', name: 'spring-jdbc'
    compile group: 'com.zaxxer', name: 'HikariCP', version: '2.6.0'
    compile group: 'com.hazelcast', name: 'hazelcast-hibernate5', version: '1.2'
    compile group: 'com.hazelcast', name: 'hazelcast', version: '3.7.5'
    testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.11'
}

By examining the dependencies carefully we see the hikari pool, the postgresql driver, spring data jpa and of course hazelcast.

Instead of creating the database manually we will automate it by utilizing the database initialization feature of Spring boot.

We shall create a file called schema.sql under the resources folder.

create schema spring_data_jpa_example;

create table spring_data_jpa_example.employee(
    id  SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
    firstname   TEXT    NOT NULL,
    lastname    TEXT    NOT NULL,
    email       TEXT    not null,
    age         INT     NOT NULL,
    salary         real,
    unique(email)
);

insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary)
values ('Test','Me','test@me.com',18,3000.23);

To keep it simple and avoid any further configurations we shall put the configurations for datasource, jpa and caching inside the application.yml file.

spring:
  datasource:
    continue-on-error: true
    type: com.zaxxer.hikari.HikariDataSource
    url: jdbc:postgresql://172.17.0.2:5432/postgres
    driver-class-name: org.postgresql.Driver
    username: postgres
    password: postgres
    hikari:
      idle-timeout: 10000
  jpa:
    properties:
      hibernate:
        cache:
          use_second_level_cache: true
          use_query_cache: true
          region:
            factory_class: com.hazelcast.hibernate.HazelcastCacheRegionFactory
    show-sql: true

The configuration spring.datasource.continue-on-error is crucial since once the application relaunches, there should be a second attempt to create the database and thus a crash is inevitable.

Any hibernate specific properties reside at the spring.jpa.properties path. We enabled the second level cache and the query cache.

Also we set show-sql to true. This means that once a query hits the database it shall be logged through the console.

Then create our employee entity.

package com.gkatzioura.hibernate.enitites;

import javax.persistence.*;

import java.io.Serializable;

import org.hibernate.annotations.Cache;
import org.hibernate.annotations.CacheConcurrencyStrategy;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 2/6/17.
 */
@Entity
@Table(name = "employee", schema="spring_data_jpa_example")
@Cache(usage = CacheConcurrencyStrategy.READ_WRITE)
public class Employee implements Serializable {

    @Id
    @Column(name = "id")
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE)
    private Long id;

    @Column(name = "firstname")
    private String firstName;

    @Column(name = "lastname")
    private String lastname;

    @Column(name = "email")
    private String email;

    @Column(name = "age")
    private Integer age;

    @Column(name = "salary")
    private Integer salary;

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getFirstName() {
        return firstName;
    }

    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
    }

    public String getLastname() {
        return lastname;
    }

    public void setLastname(String lastname) {
        this.lastname = lastname;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public Integer getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(Integer age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public Integer getSalary() {
        return salary;
    }

    public void setSalary(Integer salary) {
        this.salary = salary;
    }
}

Everything is setup. Spring boot will detect the entity and create an EntityManagerFactory on its own.
What comes next is the repository class for employee.

package com.gkatzioura.hibernate.repository;

import com.gkatzioura.hibernate.enitites.Employee;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;
import org.springframework.data.repository.CrudRepository;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 2/11/17.
 */
public interface EmployeeRepository extends JpaRepository {
}

And the last one is the controller

package com.gkatzioura.hibernate.controller;

import com.gkatzioura.hibernate.enitites.Employee;
import com.gkatzioura.hibernate.repository.EmployeeRepository;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestParam;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import java.util.List;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 2/6/17.
 */
@RestController
public class EmployeeController {

    @Autowired
    private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

    @RequestMapping("/employee")
    public List testIt() {

        return employeeRepository.findAll();
    }

    @RequestMapping("/employee/{employeeId}")
    public Employee getEmployee(@PathVariable Long employeeId) {

        return employeeRepository.findOne(employeeId);
    }

}

Once we issue a request at
http://localhost:8080/employee/1

Console will display the query issued at the database

Hibernate: select employee0_.id as id1_0_0_, employee0_.age as age2_0_0_, employee0_.email as email3_0_0_, employee0_.firstname as firstnam4_0_0_, employee0_.lastname as lastname5_0_0_, employee0_.salary as salary6_0_0_ from spring_data_jpa_example.employee employee0_ where employee0_.id=?

The second time we issue the request, since we have the second cache enabled there won’t be a query issued upon the database. Instead the entity shall be fetched from the second level cache.

You can download the project from github.

Spring Security and Password Encoding

On previous posts we dived into spring security. We implemented security backed by jdbc, security based on custom jdbc queries and security retrieving information from a nosql database.

By being careful enough we will find out that passwords are in plain text. Although this serves well for example purposes in real environments, passwords are always encoded and stored encoded in the database.

Spring security supports password encoding in a pretty convenient way. It comes with its own preconfigured password encoders but It alsos gives us the ability to either create our custom password encoder.

StandardPasswordEncoder, Md5PasswordEncoder and the popular BCryptPasswordEncoder are some of the password encoders that come along with spring security.

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security;

import org.junit.Test;
import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.encoding.Md5PasswordEncoder;
import org.springframework.security.crypto.bcrypt.BCryptPasswordEncoder;
import org.springframework.security.crypto.password.StandardPasswordEncoder;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 10/5/16.
 */
public class EncoderTest {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(EncoderTest.class);

    @Test
    public void md5Encoder() {

        Md5PasswordEncoder md5PasswordEncoder = new Md5PasswordEncoder();
        String encoded = md5PasswordEncoder.encodePassword("test_pass",null);

        LOGGER.info("Md5 encoded "+encoded);
    }

    @Test
    public void bcryptEncoder() {

        BCryptPasswordEncoder bCryptPasswordEncoder = new BCryptPasswordEncoder();
        String encoded = bCryptPasswordEncoder.encode("test_pass");

        LOGGER.info("Becrypt encoded "+encoded);
    }

    @Test
    public void standardEncoder() {

        StandardPasswordEncoder standardPasswordEncoder = new StandardPasswordEncoder();
        String encoded = standardPasswordEncoder.encode("test_pass");

        LOGGER.info("Standard encoded "+encoded);
    }

}

To add password encoding all we have to do is to set a password encoder in our spring configuration.

With jdbc-backed spring security configuration it is pretty easy, we just set the password encoder of our choice. In our case, we will use the bcrypt password encoder.

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security.config;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Profile;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.authentication.builders.AuthenticationManagerBuilder;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.EnableWebSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter;
import org.springframework.security.crypto.bcrypt.BCryptPasswordEncoder;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 10/5/16.
 */
@EnableWebSecurity
@Profile("encodedjdbcpassword")
public class PasswordEncodedSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired
    private DataSource dataSource;

    @Override
    protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {

        auth.jdbcAuthentication().dataSource(dataSource)
                .passwordEncoder(new BCryptPasswordEncoder())
                .usersByUsernameQuery("SELECT username,password,1 FROM Custom_Users_Encoded_pass where username=?")
                .authoritiesByUsernameQuery("SELECT username,authority FROM Custom_Roles where username=?");
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        http.authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/public").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and()
                .formLogin()
                .permitAll()
                .and()
                .logout()
                .permitAll();
    }

}

Then we will add a user to the database with the encoded password.

drop table if exists Custom_Users_Encoded_pass;
create table Custom_Users_Encoded_pass(id bigint auto_increment, username varchar(255), password varchar(255));
-- real password is test_pass
insert into Custom_Users_Encoded_pass(username,password) values('TestUser','$2a$10$nA8k2TPoXgACwWhCZXhomOlvwtNReWprcVgjRpDiZNAGXN3UMLgSO');

Therefore by trying to access
http://localhost:8080/secured will have to give the username TestUser and the password test_pass in the login prompt.

Last but not least we will have to change our gradle.build to set encodedjdbcpassword as our default profile.

bootRun {
    systemProperty "spring.profiles.active", "encodedjdbcpassword"
}

You can find the sourcecode on github.

Spring boot with Spring Security and jdbc Part 2

On a previous post we implemented security based on the default table schemas that Spring Security issues requests.

Considering users and roles, application developers use a schema that fits their needs. Spring gives us the ability to specify the queries needed in order to retrieve information such as username, password and roles.

Our custom tables will be pretty different from the tables of the first example.

drop table if exists Custom_Users;
create table Custom_Users(id bigint auto_increment, username varchar(255), password varchar(255));
insert into Custom_Users(username,password) values('TestUser','TestPass');

drop table if exists Custom_Roles;
create table Custom_Roles(username varchar(255),authority  varchar(255), UNIQUE(username,authority));
insert into Custom_Roles(username,authority) values('TestUser','superadmin');

In order to use these tables with spring security we must pass the queries that spring security will use in order to retrieve the security information needed.

To do so we will create a security configuration that will set up the queries needed.

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security.config;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Profile;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.authentication.builders.AuthenticationManagerBuilder;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.EnableWebSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter;

import javax.sql.DataSource;


/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 9/20/16.
 */
@EnableWebSecurity
@Profile("customquery")
public class CustomQuerySecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired
    private DataSource dataSource;

    @Autowired
    public void configAuthentication(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth.jdbcAuthentication().dataSource(dataSource)
                .usersByUsernameQuery("SELECT username,password,1 FROM Custom_Users where username=?")
                .authoritiesByUsernameQuery("SELECT username,authority FROM Custom_Roles where username=?");
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        http.authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/public").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and()
                .formLogin()
                .permitAll()
                .and()
                .logout()
                .permitAll();
    }

}

We use spring profiles. Our spring profile would be “customquery”, therefore the CustomQuerySecurityConfig would be bound to the “customquery” profile.

In order to run, for convenience reasons we have to change the default profile in our build.gradle file.

group 'com.gkatzioura'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:1.4.0.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'spring-boot'

sourceCompatibility = 1.8

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web")
    compile("org.thymeleaf:thymeleaf-spring4")
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-security")
    compile("org.springframework:spring-jdbc")
    compile("com.h2database:h2:1.4.192")
    compile("org.slf4j:slf4j-api:1.6.6")
    compile("ch.qos.logback:logback-core:1.1.7")
    compile("ch.qos.logback:logback-classic:1.1.7")
    testCompile "junit:junit:4.11"
}

bootRun {
    systemProperty "spring.profiles.active", "customquery"
}

To run the application issue

gradle bootRun

You can find the source code on github

Spring boot and Spring data JPA integration

Nowadays spring and JPA integration has become a piece of cake thanks to Spring Boot and spring Data.

I am gonna setup a postgresql server

docker pull postgres
#run the container
docker run --name postgreslocal -e POSTGRES_PASSWORD=postgres -d postgres
#get the ip
docker inspect --format '{{ .NetworkSettings.IPAddress }}' postgreslocal
#get the port
docker inspect --format '{{ .NetworkSettings.Ports }}' postgreslocal

Create the employees Table

create schema spring_data_jpa_example;

create table spring_data_jpa_example.employee(
	id  SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
	firstname	TEXT	NOT NULL,
	lastname	TEXT	NOT NULL,	
   	email		TEXT 	not null,
   	age         INT     NOT NULL,
   	salary         real,
	unique(email)
);

insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary) 
values ('Emmanouil','Gkatziouras','gkatzioura@gmail.com',18,3000.23);

Let’s begin with our gradle file

group 'com.gkatzioura'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

apply plugin: 'java'

sourceCompatibility = 1.8

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:1.3.3.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'spring-boot'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web") {
        exclude module: "spring-boot-starter-tomcat"
    }
    compile("org.postgresql:postgresql:9.4-1206-jdbc42")
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-jetty")
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-data-jpa:1.3.3.RELEASE")
    compile("com.mchange:c3p0:0.9.5.2")
    testCompile("junit:junit:4.11");
}

As you see we added the c3p0 connection pool, the spring-boot-starter-data-jpa for hibernate and the postgres driver. That’s all we need.

The Application class

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
@SpringBootApplication
public class Application {


    public static void main(String[] args) {

        SpringApplication springApplication = new SpringApplication();
        ApplicationContext ctx = springApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }
}

The DataSource configuration

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.config;

import com.mchange.v2.c3p0.ComboPooledDataSource;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
@Configuration
public class DataSourceConfig {

    @Bean
    public DataSource createDataSource() throws Exception {

        ComboPooledDataSource ds = new ComboPooledDataSource();
        ds.setJdbcUrl("jdbc:postgresql://172.17.0.3:5432/postgres?user=postgres&password=postgres");
        ds.setDriverClass("org.postgresql.Driver");

        return ds;
    }

}

Our entity for the table employee

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.entity;

import javax.persistence.*;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
@Entity
@Table(name = "employee", schema="spring_data_jpa_example")
public class Employee {

    @Id
    @Column(name = "id")
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE)
    private Long id;

    @Column(name = "firstname")
    private String firstName;

    @Column(name = "lastname")
    private String lastname;

    @Column(name = "email")
    private String email;

    @Column(name = "age")
    private Integer age;

    @Column(name = "salary")
    private Integer salary;

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getFirstName() {
        return firstName;
    }

    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
    }

    public String getLastname() {
        return lastname;
    }

    public void setLastname(String lastname) {
        this.lastname = lastname;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public Integer getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(Integer age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public Integer getSalary() {
        return salary;
    }

    public void setSalary(Integer salary) {
        this.salary = salary;
    }
}

The repository that will help us access all users

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.repository;

import com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.entity.Employee;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Repository;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
public interface EmployeeRepository extends JpaRepository<Employee,Long>{
}

And a controller that will fetch all the data

package com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.controller;

import com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.entity.Employee;
import com.gkatzioura.springdata.jpa.persistence.repository.EmployeeRepository;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import java.util.List;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 6/2/16.
 */
@RestController
public class TestController {

    @Autowired
    private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

    @RequestMapping("/employee")
    public List<Employee> getTest() {

        return employeeRepository.findAll();
    }
}

Pretty convenient considering the dependencies and the xml configuration overhead of the past.

You can find the source code on github .

Spring Boot and Database initialization

Spring boot is hands down a great framework, saving the developer a lot of time and energy when developing a spring application.

One of its great features is database initialization.
You can use spring boot in order to initialize your sql database.

We will start with the gradle file

group 'com.gkatzioura'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

apply plugin: 'java'

sourceCompatibility = 1.5

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:1.3.3.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'spring-boot'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
} 

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web") {
        exclude module: "spring-boot-starter-tomcat"
    }
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-jetty")
    compile("org.springframework:spring-jdbc")
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-actuator")
    compile("com.h2database:h2:1.4.191")
    testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.11'
}

Pay special attention to the org.springframework:spring-jdbc dependency. Actually this is the dependency that assists with the database initialization.
H2 database is more than enough for this example.

The applications main class

package com.gkatzioura.bootdatabaseinitialization;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 29/4/2016.
 */
@SpringBootApplication
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        SpringApplication springApplication = new SpringApplication();
        ApplicationContext applicationContext = springApplication.run(Application.class,args);
    }

}

The next step is to specify the datasource

package com.gkatzioura.bootdatabaseinitialization.config;

import org.h2.jdbcx.JdbcDataSource;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Primary;

import javax.naming.Context;
import javax.naming.InitialContext;
import javax.naming.NamingException;
import javax.sql.DataSource;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 29/4/2016.
 */
@Configuration
public class DataSourceConfig {

    private static final String TEMP_DIRECTORY = System.getProperty("java.io.tmpdir");

    @Bean(name = "mainDataSource")
    public DataSource createMainDataSource() {

        JdbcDataSource ds = new JdbcDataSource();
        ds.setURL("jdbc:h2:"+TEMP_DIRECTORY+"/testdata;MODE=MySQL");
        return ds;
    }

}

We will add a schema.sql file to the resource folder so it would be loaded to classpath. The schema.sql file would contain all the table definitions needed for our database.

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `Users` (
    `user_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `name` varchar(200) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`user_id`)
);

Next file to add is data.sql on the resources folder. This file will contain the sql statements needed to populate our database.

INSERT INTO `Users` (`user_id`,`name`) VALUES (null,'nick');
INSERT INTO `Users` (`user_id`,`name`) VALUES (null,'george');

On initialization spring boot will search for the data.sql and schema.sql files and execute them with the Database initializer.

So far so good, however when you have two datasources defined, things get complicated.
We shall add a secondary datasource

package com.gkatzioura.bootdatabaseinitialization.config;

import org.h2.jdbcx.JdbcDataSource;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Primary;

import javax.naming.Context;
import javax.naming.InitialContext;
import javax.naming.NamingException;
import javax.sql.DataSource;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 29/4/2016.
 */
@Configuration
public class DataSourceConfig {

    private static final String TEMP_DIRECTORY = System.getProperty("java.io.tmpdir");

    @Bean(name = "mainDataSource")
    public DataSource createMainDataSource() {

        JdbcDataSource ds = new JdbcDataSource();
        ds.setURL("jdbc:h2:"+TEMP_DIRECTORY+"/testdata;MODE=MySQL");
        return ds;
    }

    @Bean(name = "secondaryDataSource")
    public DataSource createSecondaryDataSource() {

        JdbcDataSource ds = new JdbcDataSource();
        ds.setURL("jdbc:h2:"+TEMP_DIRECTORY+"/secondarydata;MODE=MySQL");
        return ds;
    }
}

By starting the application we get an error

Caused by: org.springframework.beans.factory.NoUniqueBeanDefinitionException: No qualifying bean of type [javax.sql.DataSource] is defined: expected single matching bean but found 2: mainDataSource,secondaryDataSource

The problem is that the datasource initializer gets injected with a datasource. So we have to specify the datasource inject or else we will get an exception.
A workaround is to specify which datasource bean is the primary one.

    @Bean(name = "mainDataSource")
    @Primary
    public DataSource createMainDataSource() {

        JdbcDataSource ds = new JdbcDataSource();
        ds.setURL("jdbc:h2:"+TEMP_DIRECTORY+"/testdata;MODE=MySQL");
        return ds;
    }

By doing so the initializer will run the schema.sql and data.sql scripts using the mainDataSource bean.

Another great feature of spring boot database is initialization is that it can be integrated with flyway. Get more information on flyway here.

You can find the project source code here

Add ssl to Mysql and Postgresql

Adding ssl support to a relational database like mysql or postgresql is a standard task.

First we need to have our certificates ready.
We can either use mysql workbench which has a nice wizard.
Or we can create them using openssl.

In the end we will end up with three files

ssl-ca=ca.pem
ssl-cert=server-cert.pem
ssl-key=server-key.pem

We can also check that everything is ok by making a basic test.
Start an open ssl server

/usr/bin/openssl s_server -cert server-cert.pem -key server-key.pem

and a client to connect

openssl s_client -CAfile ca.pem -connect 127.0.0.1:4433

In case of no errors you are good to go.

In case of mysql we shall create a directory and put our certificates in it

mkdir /etc/mysql-ssl
mv ca.pem /etc/mysql-ssl
mv server-cert.pem /etc/mysql-ssl
mv server-key.pem /etc/mysql-ssl
chown -R mysql mysql-ssl

Now we shall edit /etc/my.cnf and on the [mysqld] section add

[mysqld]
ssl-ca=/etc/mysql-ssl/ca.pem
ssl-cert=/etc/mysql-ssl/server-cert.pem
ssl-key=/etc/mysql-ssl/server-key.pem

Now when we login to mysql by issuing show global variables like ‘%ssl%’ we get

mysql> show global variables like '%ssl%';
+---------------+--------------------------------+
| Variable_name | Value                          |
+---------------+--------------------------------+
| have_openssl  | YES                            |
| have_ssl      | YES                            |
| ssl_ca        | /etc/mysql-ssl/ca.pem          |
| ssl_capath    |                                |
| ssl_cert      | /etc/mysql-ssl/server-cert.pem |
| ssl_cipher    |                                |
| ssl_crl       |                                |
| ssl_crlpath   |                                |
| ssl_key       | /etc/mysql-ssl/server-key.pem  |
+---------------+--------------------------------+

Suppose we have a database called tutorial_database, we will create a user that will have access to it only through ssl

create user 'tutorial_user'@'%' identified by 'yourpass';
grant all privileges on tutorial_database.* to 'tutorial_user'@'%' REQUIRE SSL;;

It order to connect with this user for example by using mysql client you need

mysql --ssl-ca=ca.pem -u tutorial_user -h yourhost -p

Using the ca.pem created previously

Now on postgresql things are easy too

Place your server certificate and your server key to your postgres data directory

cp server-cert.pem $PGDATA/server.crt
cp server-key.pem $PGDATA/server.key

Also change your server key properties or else postgresql will not start

chmod og-rwx server.key

Next step is to edit postgresql.conf and add

ssl=on

After restarting we will be able to connect through ssl to postgres. Just add the ssl setting.

psql "sslmode=require host=yourhost dbname=tutorial_database" tutorial_user

However if we want a specific user to connect to a database with ssl then we should edit pg_hba.conf

# TYPE  DATABASE          USER            ADDRESS  METHOD
hostssl tutorial_database tutorial_user   all      md5