Read replicas and Spring Data Part 4: Configuring the read repository

Previously we set up two EntityManagers in the same application. One for the reads and one for the writes. Now it’s time to create our read repository.

The read only repository will use the secondary read only EntityManager.

In order to make it a read only repository, it is essential not to have any save and persist actions.

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.repository;

import java.util.List;

import org.springframework.data.repository.Repository;

import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.config.ReadOnlyRepository;
import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.entity.Employee;

/**
 * This is a read only repository
 */
public interface ReadEmployeeRepository extends Repository {

    List findAll();

}

Our next task would be to create this repository with the read database entity manager.
This means that all repositories shall be created using the default entity manager except from the read only repositories.

I would create an Annotation first. This annotation will declare my repository as Read only. Also I will use this annotation for the scanning operation so that the appropriate EntityManager will be used.

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.config;

import java.lang.annotation.Documented;
import java.lang.annotation.ElementType;
import java.lang.annotation.Retention;
import java.lang.annotation.RetentionPolicy;
import java.lang.annotation.Target;

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target({ElementType.TYPE})
@Documented
public @interface ReadOnlyRepository {
}

Now I know that spring boot removes the need for annotations and does repository creation in an automated way however our case is a peculiar one.

By making some adjustments our read only repository will look like this

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.repository;

import java.util.List;

import org.springframework.data.repository.Repository;

import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.config.ReadOnlyRepository;
import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.entity.Employee;

/**
 * This is a read only repository
 */
@ReadOnlyRepository
public interface ReadEmployeeRepository extends Repository {

    List findAll();

}

And now it’s time to work with our repository scanning. All the repositories will be injected with the main EntityManager except from the ones annotated with the @ReadOnlyRepository annotation.

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.config;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Qualifier;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.boot.jdbc.DataSourceBuilder;
import org.springframework.boot.orm.jpa.EntityManagerFactoryBuilder;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Primary;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.config.EnableJpaRepositories;
import org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean;

@Configuration
@EnableJpaRepositories(
        basePackages = "com.gkatzioura",
        excludeFilters = @ComponentScan.Filter(ReadOnlyRepository.class),
        entityManagerFactoryRef = "entityManagerFactory"
)
public class PrimaryEntityManagerConfiguration {

    @Value("${spring.datasource.username}")
    private String username;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.password}")
    private String password;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.url}")
    private String url;

    @Bean
    @Primary
    public DataSource dataSource() throws Exception {
        return DataSourceBuilder.create()
                                .url(url)
                                .username(username)
                                .password(password)
                                .driverClassName("org.postgresql.Driver")
                                .build();
    }

    @Bean
    @Primary
    public LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean entityManagerFactory(
            EntityManagerFactoryBuilder builder,
            @Qualifier("dataSource") DataSource dataSource) {
        return builder.dataSource(dataSource)
                      .packages("com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica")
                      .persistenceUnit("main")
                      .build();
    }

}

Also we will add the configuration for the read only repositories.

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.config;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Qualifier;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.boot.jdbc.DataSourceBuilder;
import org.springframework.boot.orm.jpa.EntityManagerFactoryBuilder;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.config.EnableJpaRepositories;
import org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean;

@Configuration
@EnableJpaRepositories(
        basePackages = "com.gkatzioura",
        includeFilters= @ComponentScan.Filter(ReadOnlyRepository.class),
        entityManagerFactoryRef = "readEntityManagerFactory"
)
public class ReadOnlyEntityManagerConfiguration {

    @Value("${spring.datasource.username}")
    private String username;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.password}")
    private String password;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.readUrl}")
    private String readUrl;

    @Bean
    public DataSource readDataSource() throws Exception {
        return DataSourceBuilder.create()
                                .url(readUrl)
                                .username(username)
                                .password(password)
                                .driverClassName("org.postgresql.Driver")
                                .build();
    }

    @Bean
    public LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean readEntityManagerFactory(
            EntityManagerFactoryBuilder builder,
            @Qualifier("readDataSource") DataSource dataSource) {
        return builder.dataSource(dataSource)
                      .packages("com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica")
                      .persistenceUnit("read")
                      .build();
    }

}

The secondary entity manager will be injected only to the repositories that only have the @ReadOnlyRepository annotation.

And to show this let’s make some changes to our controller.

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.controller;

import java.util.List;

import org.springframework.http.HttpStatus;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PostMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.ResponseStatus;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.entity.Employee;
import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.repository.EmployeeRepository;
import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.repository.ReadEmployeeRepository;

@RestController
public class EmployeeContoller {

    private final EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;
    private final ReadEmployeeRepository readEmployeeRepository;

    public EmployeeContoller(EmployeeRepository employeeRepository,
                             ReadEmployeeRepository readEmployeeRepository) {
        this.employeeRepository = employeeRepository;
        this.readEmployeeRepository = readEmployeeRepository;
    }

    @GetMapping("/employee")
    public List getEmployees() {
        return employeeRepository.findAll();
    }

    @GetMapping("/employee/read")
    public List getEmployeesRead() {
        return readEmployeeRepository.findAll();
    }

    @PostMapping("/employee")
    @ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.CREATED)
    public void addEmployee(@RequestBody Employee employee) {
        employeeRepository.save(employee);
    }

}

As you add employees to the system the read only repository will keep fetching the old employees while the main repository will fetch all of them including the recently persisted.

Read replicas and Spring Data Part 3: Configuring two entity managers

Our previous setup works as expected. What we shall do now is to get one step further and configure two separate entity managers without affecting the functionality we achieved previously.

The first step would be to set the default entity manager configuration to a primary one.
This is the first step

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.config;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Qualifier;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.boot.jdbc.DataSourceBuilder;
import org.springframework.boot.orm.jpa.EntityManagerFactoryBuilder;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Primary;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.config.EnableJpaRepositories;
import org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean;

@Configuration
public class PrimaryEntityManagerConfiguration {

    @Value("${spring.datasource.username}")
    private String username;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.password}")
    private String password;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.url}")
    private String url;

    @Bean
    @Primary
    public DataSource dataSource() throws Exception {
        return DataSourceBuilder.create()
                                .url(url)
                                .username(username)
                                .password(password)
                                .driverClassName("org.postgresql.Driver")
                                .build();
    }

    @Bean
    @Primary
    public LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean entityManagerFactory(
            EntityManagerFactoryBuilder builder,
            @Qualifier("dataSource") DataSource dataSource) {
        return builder.dataSource(dataSource)
                      .packages("com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica")
                      .persistenceUnit("main")
                      .build();
    }

}

If you run your application with this configuration it will run just like our application previously.
Now it is time to configure the read only entity manager.

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.config;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Qualifier;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.boot.jdbc.DataSourceBuilder;
import org.springframework.boot.orm.jpa.EntityManagerFactoryBuilder;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Primary;
import org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean;

@Configuration
public class ReadOnlyEntityManagerConfiguration {

    @Value("${spring.datasource.username}")
    private String username;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.password}")
    private String password;

    @Value("${spring.datasource.readUrl}")
    private String readUrl;

    @Bean
    public DataSource readDataSource() throws Exception {
        return DataSourceBuilder.create()
                                .url(readUrl)
                                .username(username)
                                .password(password)
                                .driverClassName("org.postgresql.Driver")
                                .build();
    }

    @Bean
    public LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean readEntityManagerFactory(
            EntityManagerFactoryBuilder builder,
            @Qualifier("readDataSource") DataSource dataSource) {
        return builder.dataSource(dataSource)
                      .packages("com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica")
                      .persistenceUnit("read")
                      .build();
    }

}

Also I will add a method to a controller in order to save the models.

package com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.controller;

import java.util.List;

import org.springframework.http.HttpStatus;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PostMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.ResponseStatus;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.entity.Employee;
import com.gkatzioura.springdatareadreplica.repository.EmployeeRepository;

@RestController
public class EmployeeContoller {

    private final EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

    public EmployeeContoller(EmployeeRepository employeeRepository) {
        this.employeeRepository = employeeRepository;
    }

    @GetMapping("/employee")
    public List<Employee> getEmployees() {
        return employeeRepository.findAll();
    }

    @PostMapping("/employee")
    @ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.CREATED)
    public void addEmployee(@RequestBody Employee employee) {
        employeeRepository.save(employee);
    }

}

If you do try to add the an employee using the controller and then query the read database you shall see that no entry is being added at all.

So we have our primary entity manager up and running and we also have a secondary one. The secondary one is not used yet. The next blog focuses on putting the secondary read only entity manager in use.

Hibernate Caching with HazelCast: Basic configuration

Previously we went through an introduction on JPA caching, the mechanisms and what hibernate offers.

What comes next is a hibernate project using Hazelcast as a second level cache.

We will use a basic spring boot project for this purpose with JPA. Spring boot uses hibernate as the default JPA provider.
Our setup will be pretty close to the one of a previous post.
We will use postgresql with docker for our sql database.

group 'com.gkatzioura'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:1.5.1.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'org.springframework.boot'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web")
    compile group: 'org.springframework.boot', name: 'spring-boot-starter-data-jpa'
    compile group: 'org.postgresql', name:'postgresql', version:'9.4-1206-jdbc42'
    compile group: 'org.springframework', name: 'spring-jdbc'
    compile group: 'com.zaxxer', name: 'HikariCP', version: '2.6.0'
    compile group: 'com.hazelcast', name: 'hazelcast-hibernate5', version: '1.2'
    compile group: 'com.hazelcast', name: 'hazelcast', version: '3.7.5'
    testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.11'
}

By examining the dependencies carefully we see the hikari pool, the postgresql driver, spring data jpa and of course hazelcast.

Instead of creating the database manually we will automate it by utilizing the database initialization feature of Spring boot.

We shall create a file called schema.sql under the resources folder.

create schema spring_data_jpa_example;

create table spring_data_jpa_example.employee(
    id  SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
    firstname   TEXT    NOT NULL,
    lastname    TEXT    NOT NULL,
    email       TEXT    not null,
    age         INT     NOT NULL,
    salary         real,
    unique(email)
);

insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary)
values ('Test','Me','test@me.com',18,3000.23);

To keep it simple and avoid any further configurations we shall put the configurations for datasource, jpa and caching inside the application.yml file.

spring:
  datasource:
    continue-on-error: true
    type: com.zaxxer.hikari.HikariDataSource
    url: jdbc:postgresql://172.17.0.2:5432/postgres
    driver-class-name: org.postgresql.Driver
    username: postgres
    password: postgres
    hikari:
      idle-timeout: 10000
  jpa:
    properties:
      hibernate:
        cache:
          use_second_level_cache: true
          use_query_cache: true
          region:
            factory_class: com.hazelcast.hibernate.HazelcastCacheRegionFactory
    show-sql: true

The configuration spring.datasource.continue-on-error is crucial since once the application relaunches, there should be a second attempt to create the database and thus a crash is inevitable.

Any hibernate specific properties reside at the spring.jpa.properties path. We enabled the second level cache and the query cache.

Also we set show-sql to true. This means that once a query hits the database it shall be logged through the console.

Then create our employee entity.

package com.gkatzioura.hibernate.enitites;

import javax.persistence.*;

import java.io.Serializable;

import org.hibernate.annotations.Cache;
import org.hibernate.annotations.CacheConcurrencyStrategy;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 2/6/17.
 */
@Entity
@Table(name = "employee", schema="spring_data_jpa_example")
@Cache(usage = CacheConcurrencyStrategy.READ_WRITE)
public class Employee implements Serializable {

    @Id
    @Column(name = "id")
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE)
    private Long id;

    @Column(name = "firstname")
    private String firstName;

    @Column(name = "lastname")
    private String lastname;

    @Column(name = "email")
    private String email;

    @Column(name = "age")
    private Integer age;

    @Column(name = "salary")
    private Integer salary;

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getFirstName() {
        return firstName;
    }

    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
    }

    public String getLastname() {
        return lastname;
    }

    public void setLastname(String lastname) {
        this.lastname = lastname;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public Integer getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(Integer age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public Integer getSalary() {
        return salary;
    }

    public void setSalary(Integer salary) {
        this.salary = salary;
    }
}

Everything is setup. Spring boot will detect the entity and create an EntityManagerFactory on its own.
What comes next is the repository class for employee.

package com.gkatzioura.hibernate.repository;

import com.gkatzioura.hibernate.enitites.Employee;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;
import org.springframework.data.repository.CrudRepository;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 2/11/17.
 */
public interface EmployeeRepository extends JpaRepository {
}

And the last one is the controller

package com.gkatzioura.hibernate.controller;

import com.gkatzioura.hibernate.enitites.Employee;
import com.gkatzioura.hibernate.repository.EmployeeRepository;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestParam;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import java.util.List;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 2/6/17.
 */
@RestController
public class EmployeeController {

    @Autowired
    private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

    @RequestMapping("/employee")
    public List testIt() {

        return employeeRepository.findAll();
    }

    @RequestMapping("/employee/{employeeId}")
    public Employee getEmployee(@PathVariable Long employeeId) {

        return employeeRepository.findOne(employeeId);
    }

}

Once we issue a request at
http://localhost:8080/employee/1

Console will display the query issued at the database

Hibernate: select employee0_.id as id1_0_0_, employee0_.age as age2_0_0_, employee0_.email as email3_0_0_, employee0_.firstname as firstnam4_0_0_, employee0_.lastname as lastname5_0_0_, employee0_.salary as salary6_0_0_ from spring_data_jpa_example.employee employee0_ where employee0_.id=?

The second time we issue the request, since we have the second cache enabled there won’t be a query issued upon the database. Instead the entity shall be fetched from the second level cache.

You can download the project from github.

Spring boot with Spring Security and jdbc Part 2

On a previous post we implemented security based on the default table schemas that Spring Security issues requests.

Considering users and roles, application developers use a schema that fits their needs. Spring gives us the ability to specify the queries needed in order to retrieve information such as username, password and roles.

Our custom tables will be pretty different from the tables of the first example.

drop table if exists Custom_Users;
create table Custom_Users(id bigint auto_increment, username varchar(255), password varchar(255));
insert into Custom_Users(username,password) values('TestUser','TestPass');

drop table if exists Custom_Roles;
create table Custom_Roles(username varchar(255),authority  varchar(255), UNIQUE(username,authority));
insert into Custom_Roles(username,authority) values('TestUser','superadmin');

In order to use these tables with spring security we must pass the queries that spring security will use in order to retrieve the security information needed.

To do so we will create a security configuration that will set up the queries needed.

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security.config;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Profile;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.authentication.builders.AuthenticationManagerBuilder;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.EnableWebSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter;

import javax.sql.DataSource;


/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 9/20/16.
 */
@EnableWebSecurity
@Profile("customquery")
public class CustomQuerySecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired
    private DataSource dataSource;

    @Autowired
    public void configAuthentication(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth.jdbcAuthentication().dataSource(dataSource)
                .usersByUsernameQuery("SELECT username,password,1 FROM Custom_Users where username=?")
                .authoritiesByUsernameQuery("SELECT username,authority FROM Custom_Roles where username=?");
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        http.authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/public").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and()
                .formLogin()
                .permitAll()
                .and()
                .logout()
                .permitAll();
    }

}

We use spring profiles. Our spring profile would be “customquery”, therefore the CustomQuerySecurityConfig would be bound to the “customquery” profile.

In order to run, for convenience reasons we have to change the default profile in our build.gradle file.

group 'com.gkatzioura'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:1.4.0.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'spring-boot'

sourceCompatibility = 1.8

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web")
    compile("org.thymeleaf:thymeleaf-spring4")
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-security")
    compile("org.springframework:spring-jdbc")
    compile("com.h2database:h2:1.4.192")
    compile("org.slf4j:slf4j-api:1.6.6")
    compile("ch.qos.logback:logback-core:1.1.7")
    compile("ch.qos.logback:logback-classic:1.1.7")
    testCompile "junit:junit:4.11"
}

bootRun {
    systemProperty "spring.profiles.active", "customquery"
}

To run the application issue

gradle bootRun

You can find the source code on github

Spring boot with Spring Security and jdbc

Spring security Is a wonderful framework saving lots of time and effort from the developers. Also It is flexible enough to customize and bring it down to your needs.

Working with JDBC and Spring Security is pretty easy and many actions are automated. This would be a minimal showcase.

The gradle file contains dependencies such as spring-security, spring-jdbc and h2 database. Since there would be a series of articles bootRun will set a spring profile on startup, In our case the profile called simple.

group 'com.gkatzioura'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:1.4.0.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'spring-boot'

sourceCompatibility = 1.8

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web")
    compile("org.thymeleaf:thymeleaf-spring4")
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-security")
    compile("org.springframework:spring-jdbc")
    compile("com.h2database:h2:1.4.192")
    compile("org.slf4j:slf4j-api:1.6.6")
    compile("ch.qos.logback:logback-core:1.1.7")
    compile("ch.qos.logback:logback-classic:1.1.7")
    testCompile "junit:junit:4.11"
}

bootRun {
    systemProperty "spring.profiles.active", "simple"
}

Tables containing certain information must be created. Those tables will have the default name and column names that Spring security lookups in order to get information.

drop table if exists users;
create table users(id bigint auto_increment, username varchar(255), password varchar(255), enabled boolean);
insert into users(username,password,enabled) values('steve','steve',true);
insert into users(username,password,enabled) values('john','john',true);
drop table if exists authorities;
create table authorities(username  varchar(255),authority  varchar(255), UNIQUE(username,authority));
insert into authorities(username,authority) values('steve','admin');
insert into authorities(username,authority) values('john','superadmin');

Those sql statements will reside on resources/schema.sql.

First step is to create our Application class

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 9/2/16.
 */
@SpringBootApplication
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }

}

In order to get started quickly the database will be an h2 database.

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security.config;

import org.h2.jdbcx.JdbcDataSource;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;

import javax.sql.DataSource;
import java.nio.file.Files;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 9/2/16.
 */
@Configuration
public class DataSourceConfig {

    @Bean
    public DataSource createDataSource() {

        JdbcDataSource dataSource = new JdbcDataSource();
        dataSource.setURL("jdbc:h2:"+System.getProperty("java.io.tmpdir")+"/database");

        return dataSource;
    }

}

By specifying the h2 database I set the directory to be inside the temporary directory. Therefore once you restart your os the database will be gone.
As mentioned previously once the datasource bean has been initialized spring-jdbc will automatically lookup on the resource folder for a schema.sql file. In case the file exists spring-jdbc will try to execute the statements that the schema.sql contains.

Next step is to define our security configuration. We have to specify that our security will be based on jdbc. Also we must define the endpoints that will have to be secure. This security config bean will be bound to the simple profile.

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security.config;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.authentication.builders.AuthenticationManagerBuilder;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.EnableWebSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 9/2/16.
 */
@EnableWebSecurity
@Profile("simple")
public class SimpleSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired
    private DataSource dataSource;

    @Autowired
    public void configAuthentication(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth.jdbcAuthentication().dataSource(dataSource);
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        http.authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/public").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and()
                .formLogin()
                .permitAll()
                .and()
                .logout()
                .permitAll();
    }
}

Last but not least we will add a controller with a secured endpoint and a non-secured endpoint

package com.gkatzioura.spring.security.controller;

import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 9/2/16.
 */
@RestController
public class GreetController {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(GreetController.class);

    @RequestMapping(path = "/public",method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public String sayFreeHi() {
        return "Greeting";
    }

    @RequestMapping(path = "/secured",method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public String saySecureHi() {
        return "Secured";
    }

}

Once you try to access the secured endpoint the default spring security login screen will be displayed.
Proceed with one of the users specified in the sql statements (for example username: steve password: steve). In case you want to logout just hit the /login?logout endpoint.

Run the application with a

gradle bootRun

and you are good to go.

You can find the source code on github