Kafka & Zookeeper for Development: Connecting Clients to the Cluster

Previously we achieved to have our Kafka brokers connect to a ZooKeeper ensemble. Also we brought down some brokers checked the election leadership and produced/consumed some messages.

For now we want to make sure that we will be able to connect to those nodes. The problem with connecting to the ensemble we created previously is that it is located inside the container network. When a client interacts with one of the brokers and receives the full list of the brokers he will receive a list of IPs not accessible to it.

So the initial handshake of a client will be successful but then the client will try to interact withs some unreachable hosts.

In order to tackle this we will have a combination of workarounds.

The first one would be to bind the port of each Kafka broker to a different local ip.

kafka-1 will be mapped to 127.0.0.1:9092
kafka-2 will be mapped to 127.0.0.2:9092
kafka-3 will be mapped to 127.0.0.3:9092

So let’s create the aliases of those addresses

sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.2
sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.3

Now it’s possible to do the ip binding. Let’s also put those entries to our /etc/hosts. By doing this, we achieve our local network and our docker network to be in agreement on which broker they should access.

127.0.0.1	kafka-1
127.0.0.2	kafka-2
127.0.0.3	kafka-3

The next step is also to change the KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS on each broker. We will adapt this to the DNS entry of each broker. By setting KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS the clients from the outside can correctly connect to it, to an address reachable to them and not an address through the internal network. Further explanations can be found on this blog.

  kafka-1:
    container_name: kafka-1
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
    - "127.0.0.1:9092:9092"
    volumes:
    - type: bind
      source: ./server1.properties
      target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
    depends_on:
      - zookeeper-1
      - zookeeper-2
      - zookeeper-3
    environment:
      KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS: "PLAINTEXT://kafka-1:9092"
  kafka-2:
    container_name: kafka-2
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
      - "127.0.0.2:9092:9092"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./server2.properties
        target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
    depends_on:
      - zookeeper-1
      - zookeeper-2
      - zookeeper-3
    environment:
      KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS: "PLAINTEXT://kafka-2:9092"
  kafka-3:
    container_name: kafka-3
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
      - "127.0.0.3:9092:9092"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./server3.properties
        target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
    depends_on:
      - zookeeper-1
      - zookeeper-2
      - zookeeper-3
    environment:
      KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS: "PLAINTEXT://kafka-3:9092"

We see the port binding change as well as the KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS. Now let’s wrap everything together in our docker-compose

version: "3.8"
services:
  zookeeper-1:
    container_name: zookeeper-1
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2181:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "1"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.2=zookeeper-2:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  zookeeper-2:
    container_name: zookeeper-2
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2182:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "2"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=zookeeper-1:2888:3888;2181 server.2=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  zookeeper-3:
    container_name: zookeeper-3
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2183:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "3"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=zookeeper-1:2888:3888;2181 server.2=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  kafka-1:
    container_name: kafka-1
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
    - "127.0.0.1:9092:9092"
    volumes:
    - type: bind
      source: ./server1.properties
      target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
    depends_on:
      - zookeeper-1
      - zookeeper-2
      - zookeeper-3
    environment:
      KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS: "PLAINTEXT://kafka-1:9092"
  kafka-2:
    container_name: kafka-2
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
      - "127.0.0.2:9092:9092"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./server2.properties
        target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
    depends_on:
      - zookeeper-1
      - zookeeper-2
      - zookeeper-3
    environment:
      KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS: "PLAINTEXT://kafka-2:9092"
  kafka-3:
    container_name: kafka-3
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
      - "127.0.0.3:9092:9092"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./server3.properties
        target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
    depends_on:
      - zookeeper-1
      - zookeeper-2
      - zookeeper-3
    environment:
      KAFKA_ADVERTISED_LISTENERS: "PLAINTEXT://kafka-3:9092"

Last but not least you can find the code on github.

Kafka & Zookeeper for Development: Connecting Brokers to the Ensemble

Previously we created successfully a Zookeeper ensemble, now it’s time to add some Kafka brokers that will connect to the ensemble and we shall execute some commands.

We will pick up from the same docker compose file we compiled previously. First let’s jump on the configuration that a Kafka broker needs.

offsets.topic.replication.factor=1
transaction.state.log.replication.factor=1
transaction.state.log.min.isr=1
group.initial.rebalance.delay.ms=0
socket.send.buffer.bytes=102400
delete.topic.enable=true
socket.request.max.bytes=104857600
log.cleaner.enable=true
log.retention.check.interval.ms=300000
log.retention.hours=168
num.io.threads=8
broker.id=0
log4j.opts=-Dlog4j.configuration=file:/etc/kafka/log4j.properties
log.dirs=/var/lib/kafka
auto.create.topics.enable=true
num.network.threads=3
socket.receive.buffer.bytes=102400
log.segment.bytes=1073741824
num.recovery.threads.per.data.dir=1
num.partitions=1
zookeeper.connection.timeout.ms=6000
zookeeper.connect=zookeeper-1:2181,zookeeper-2:2181,zookeeper-3:2181

Will go through the ones that is essential to know.

  • offsets.topic.replication.factor: how the internal offset topic gets replicated – replication factor
  • transaction.state.log.replication.factor: how the internal transaction topic gets replicated – replication factor
  • transaction.state.log.min.isr: the minimum in sync replicas for the internal transaction topic
  • delete.topic.enable: if not true Kafka will ignore the delete topic command
  • socket.request.max.bytes: the maximum size of requests
  • log.retention.check.interval.ms: the interval to evaluate if a log should be deleted
  • log.retention.hours: how many hours a log is retained before getting deleted
  • broker.id: what is the broker id of that installation
  • log.dirs: the directories where Kafka will store the log data, can be a comma separated
  • auto.create.topics.enable: create topics if they don’t exist on sending/consuming messages or asking for topic metadata
  • num.network.threads: threads on receiving requests and sending responses from the network
  • socket.receive.buffer.bytes: buffer of the server socket
  • log.segment.bytes: the size of a log file
  • num.recovery.threads.per.data.dir: threads used for log recovery at startup and flushing at shutdown
  • num.partitions: has to do with the default number of partition a topic will have once created if partition number is not specified.
  • zookeeper.connection.timeout.ms: time needed for a client to establish connection to ZooKeeper
  • zookeeper.connect: is the list of the ZooKeeper servers

Now it’s time to create the properties for each broker. Due to the broker.id property we need to have different files with the corresponding broker.id

So our first’s brokers file would look like this (broker.id 1). Keep in mind that those brokers will run on the same docker-compose file. Therefore the zookeeper.connect property contains the internal docker compose dns names. The name of the file would be named server1.properties.

socket.send.buffer.bytes=102400
delete.topic.enable=true
socket.request.max.bytes=104857600
log.cleaner.enable=true
log.retention.check.interval.ms=300000
log.retention.hours=168
num.io.threads=8
broker.id=1
transaction.state.log.replication.factor=1
log4j.opts=-Dlog4j.configuration\=file\:/etc/kafka/log4j.properties
group.initial.rebalance.delay.ms=0
log.dirs=/var/lib/kafka
auto.create.topics.enable=true
offsets.topic.replication.factor=1
num.network.threads=3
socket.receive.buffer.bytes=102400
log.segment.bytes=1073741824
num.recovery.threads.per.data.dir=1
num.partitions=1
transaction.state.log.min.isr=1
zookeeper.connection.timeout.ms=6000
zookeeper.connect=zookeeper-1\:2181,zookeeper-2\:2181,zookeeper-3\:2181

The same recipe applies for the broker.id=2 as well as broker.id=3

After creating those three broker configuration files it is time to change our docker-compose configuration.

version: "3.8"
services:
  zookeeper-1:
    container_name: zookeeper-1
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2181:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "1"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.2=zookeeper-2:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  zookeeper-2:
    container_name: zookeeper-2
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2182:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "2"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=zookeeper-1:2888:3888;2181 server.2=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  zookeeper-3:
    container_name: zookeeper-3
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2183:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "3"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=zookeeper-1:2888:3888;2181 server.2=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  kafka-1:
    container_name: kafka-1
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
    - "9092:9092"
    volumes:
    - type: bind
      source: ./server1.properties
      target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
  kafka-2:
    container_name: kafka-2
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
      - "9093:9092"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./server2.properties
        target: /etc/kafka/server.properties
  kafka-3:
    container_name: kafka-3
    image: confluent/kafka
    ports:
      - "9094:9092"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./server3.properties
        target: /etc/kafka/server.properties

Let’s spin up the docker-compose file.

> docker-compose -f docker-compose.yaml up

Just like the previous examples we shall run some commands through the containers.

Now that we have a proper cluster with Zookeeper and multiple Kafka brokers it is time to test them working together.
The first action is to create a topic with a replication factor of 3. The expected outcome would be for this topic to be replicated 3 kafka brokers

> docker exec -it kafka-1 /bin/bash
confluent@92a6d381d0db:/$ kafka-topics --zookeeper zookeeper-1:2181,zookeeper-2:2181,zookeeper-3:2181 --create --topic tutorial-topic --replication-factor 3 --partitions 1

Our topic has been created let’s check the description of the topic.

confluent@92a6d381d0db:/$ kafka-topics --describe --topic tutorial-topic --zookeeper zookeeper-1:2181,zookeeper-2:2181,zookeeper-3:2181
Topic:tutorial-topic	PartitionCount:1	ReplicationFactor:3	Configs:
	Topic: tutorial-topic	Partition: 0	Leader: 2	Replicas: 2,1,3	Isr: 2,1,3

As we see the Leader for the partition is broker 2

Next step is putting some data to the topic recently created. Before doing so I will add a consumer listening for messages to that topic. While we post messages to the topic those will be printed by this consumer.

> docker exec -it kafka-3 /bin/bash
confluent@4042774f8802:/$ kafka-console-consumer --topic tutorial-topic --from-beginning --zookeeper zookeeper-1:2181,zookeeper-2:2181,zookeeper-3:2181

Let’s add some topic data.

> docker exec -it kafka-1 /bin/bash
confluent@92a6d381d0db:/$ kafka-console-producer --topic tutorial-topic --broker-list kafka-1:9092,kafka-2:9092
test1
test2
test3

As expected the consumer on the other terminal will print the messages expected.

test1
test2
test3

Due to having a cluster it would be nice to stop the leader broker and see another broker to take the leadership. While doing this the expected results will be to have all the messages replicated and no disruption on consuming and publishing the messages.

Stop the leader which is broker-2

> docker stop kafka-2

Check the leadership from another broker

confluent@92a6d381d0db:/$ kafka-topics --describe --topic tutorial-topic --zookeeper zookeeper-1:2181,zookeeper-2:2181,zookeeper-3:2181
Topic:tutorial-topic	PartitionCount:1	ReplicationFactor:3	Configs:
	Topic: tutorial-topic	Partition: 0	Leader: 1	Replicas: 2,1,3	Isr: 1,3

The leader now is kafka-1

Read the messages to see that they did got replicated.

> docker exec -it kafka-3 /bin/bash
confluent@4042774f8802:/$ kafka-console-consumer --topic tutorial-topic --from-beginning --zookeeper zookeeper-1:2181,zookeeper-2:2181,zookeeper-3:2181
test1
test2
test3

As expected apart from the Leadership being in place our data have also been replicated!

If we try to post new messages, it will also be a successful action.

So to summarise we did run a Kafka cluster connected to a zookeeper ensemble. We did create a topic with replication enabled to 3 brokers and last but not least we did test what happens if one broker goes down.

On the next blog we are going to wrap it up so our local machine clients can connect to the docker compose ensemble.

Kafka & Zookeeper for Development: Zookeeper Ensemble

Previously we spun up Zookeeper and Kafka locally but also through Docker. What comes next is spinning up more than just one Kafka and Zookeeper node and create a 3 node cluster. To achieve this the easy way locally docker-compose will be used. Instead of spinning up various instances on the cloud or running various Java processes and altering configs, docker-compose will greatly help us to bootstrap a Zookeeper ensemble and the Kafka brokers, with everything needed preconfigured.

The first step is to create the Zookeeper ensemble but before going there let’s check the ports needed.
Zookeeper needs three ports.

  • 2181 is the client port. On the previous example it was the port our clients used to communicate with the server.
  • 2888 is the peer port. This is the port that zookeeper nodes use to talk to each other.
  • 3888 is the leader port. The port that nodes use to talk to each other when it comes to the leader election.

By using docker compose our nodes will use the same network and the container name will also be an internal dns entry.
The names on the zookeeper nodes would be zookeeper-1, zookeeper-2, zookeeper-3.

Our next goal is to give to each zookeeper node a configuration that will enable the nodes to discover each other.

This is the typical zookeeper configuration expected.

  • tickTime is the unit of time in milliseconds zookeeper uses for heartbeat and minimum session timeout.
  • dataDir is the location where ZooKeeper will store the in-memory database snapshots
  • initlimit and SyncLimit are used for the zookeeper synchronization.
  • server* are a list of the nodes that will have to communicate with each other

zookeeper.properties

clientPort=2181
dataDir=/var/lib/zookeeper
syncLimit=2
DATA.DIR=/var/log/zookeeper
initLimit=5
tickTime=2000
server.1=zookeeper-1:2888:3888
server.2=zookeeper-2:2888:3888
server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888

When it comes to a node the server that the node is located, should be bound to `0.0.0.0`. Thus we need three different zookeeper properties per node.

For example for the node with id 1 the file should be the following
zookeeper1.properties

clientPort=2181
dataDir=/var/lib/zookeeper
syncLimit=2
DATA.DIR=/var/log/zookeeper
initLimit=5
tickTime=2000
server.1=0.0.0.0:2888:3888
server.2=zookeeper-2:2888:3888
server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888

The next question that arises is the id file of zookeeper. How a zookeeper instance can identify which is its id.

Based on the documentation we need to specify the server ids using the myid file

The myid file is a plain text file located at a nodes dataDir containing only a number the server name.

So three myids files will be created each containing the number of the broker

myid_1.txt

1

myid_2.txt

2

myid_3.txt

3

It’s time to spin up the Zookeeper ensemble. We will use the files specified above. Different client ports are mapped to the host to avoid collision.

version: "3.8"
services:
  zookeeper-1:
    container_name: zookeeper-1
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2181:2181"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./zookeeper1.properties
        target: /conf/zoo.cfg
      - type: bind
        source: ./myid_1.txt
        target: /data/myid
  zookeeper-2:
    container_name: zookeeper-2
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2182:2181"
    volumes:
    - type: bind
      source: ./zookeeper2.properties
      target: /conf/zoo.cfg
    - type: bind
      source: ./myid_2.txt
      target: /data/myid
  zookeeper-3:
    container_name: zookeeper-3
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2183:2181"
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: ./zookeeper3.properties
        target: /conf/zoo.cfg
      - type: bind
        source: ./myid_3.txt
        target: /data/myid

Eventually instead of having all those files mounted it would be better if we had a more simple option. Hopefully the image that we use gives us the choice of specifying ids and brokers using environment variables.

version: "3.8"
services:
  zookeeper-1:
    container_name: zookeeper-1
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2181:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "1"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.2=zookeeper-2:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  zookeeper-2:
    container_name: zookeeper-2
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2182:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "2"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=zookeeper-1:2888:3888;2181 server.2=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181
  zookeeper-3:
    container_name: zookeeper-3
    image: zookeeper
    ports:
      - "2183:2181"
    environment:
      ZOO_MY_ID: "3"
      ZOO_SERVERS: server.1=zookeeper-1:2888:3888;2181 server.2=0.0.0.0:2888:3888;2181 server.3=zookeeper-3:2888:3888;2181

Now let’s check the status of our zookeeper nodes.

Let’s use the zookeeper shell to see the leaders and followers

docker exec -it zookeeper-1 /bin/bash
>./bin/zkServer.sh status
ZooKeeper JMX enabled by default
Using config: /conf/zoo.cfg
Client port found: 2181. Client address: localhost. Client SSL: false.
Mode: follower

And

> docker exec -it zookeeper-3 /bin/bash
root@81c2dc476127:/apache-zookeeper-3.6.2-bin# ./bin/zkServer.sh status
ZooKeeper JMX enabled by default
Using config: /conf/zoo.cfg
Client port found: 2181. Client address: localhost. Client SSL: false.
Mode: leader

So in this tutorial we created a Zookeeper ensemble using docker-compose and we also had a leader election. This recipe can be adapted to apply on the a set of VMs or a container orchestration engine.

On the next tutorial we shall add some Kafka brokers to connect to the ensemble.

Kafka & Zookeeper for Development: Local and Docker

Kafka popularity increases every day more and more as it takes over the streaming world. It is already provided out of the box on cloud providers like AWS, Azure and IBM Cloud.
Eventually for cases of local development it is a bit peculiar due to requiring various moving parts.

This blog will focus on making it easy for a developer to spin up some Kafka instances on a local machine without having to spin up VMs on the cloud.

We shall start with the usual Zookeeper and Kafka configuration. The example bellow will fetch a specific version so after some time is good to check the Apache Website.

> wget https://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/ftp.apache.org/kafka/2.6.0/kafka_2.13-2.6.0.tgz
> tar xvf kafka_2.13-2.6.0.tgz
> cd kafka_2.13-2.6.0

We just downloaded Kafka locally and now is the time to Spin up Kafka.

First we should spin up the Zookeeper

> ./bin/zookeeper-server-start.sh config/zookeeper.properties

Then spin up the Kafka instance

> ./bin/kafka-server-start.sh config/server.properties

As you see we only spun up one instance of Kafka & Zookeeper. This is way different from what we do in production where ZooKeeper servers should be deployed on multiple nodes. More specific 2n + 1 ZooKeeper servers where n > 0 need to be deployed. This number helps the ZooKeeper ensemble to perform majority elections for leadership.

In our case for local development one Kafka broker and one Zookeeper instances are enough in order to create and consume a topic.

Let’s push some messages to a topic. There is no need to create the topic, pushing a message will create it.

bin/kafka-console-producer.sh --topic tutorial-topic --bootstrap-server localhost:9092
>a
>b
>c

Then let’s read it. Pay attention to the –from-beginning flag, all the messages submitted from the beginning shall be read.

bin/kafka-console-consumer.sh --topic tutorial-topic --from-beginning --bootstrap-server localhost:9092
>a
>b
>c

Now let’s try and do this using docker. The advantage of docker is that we can run Kafka on a local docker network and add as many machines as needed and establish a Zookeeper ensemble the easy way.

Start zookeeper first

docker run --rm --name zookeeper -p 2181:2181 confluent/zookeeper

And then start your docker container after doing a link with the zookeeper container.

docker run --rm --name kafka -p 9092:9092 --link zookeeper:zookeeper confluent/kafka

Let’s create the messages through docker. As with most docker images you already have the tools needed bundled inside the image.
So the publish command would very close to the command we executed previously.

> docker exec -it kafka /bin/bash
kafka-console-producer --topic tutorial-topic --broker-list localhost:9092
a
b
c

The same applies for the consume command.

> docker exec -it kafka /bin/bash
kafka-console-consumer --topic tutorial-topic --from-beginning --zookeeper zookeeper:2181
a
b
c

That’s it! We Just run Kafka locally for local development seamlessly!

Spring Boot and Micrometer with Prometheus Part 5: Spinning up prometheus

Previously we got our Spring Boot Application adapter in order to expose the endpoints for prometheus.
This blog will focus on setting up prometheus and configure it in order to server the Spring Boot Endpoints.
So let’s get started by spinning up the prometheus server using docker.

Before proceeding on spinning up prometheus we need to supply a configuration file to pull data from our application.
Thus we should supply a prometheus.yaml file with the following contents.

scrape_configs:
  - job_name: 'prometheus-spring'
    scrape_interval: 1m
    metrics_path: '/actuator/prometheus'
    static_configs:
      - targets: ['my.local.machine:8080']

Let’s use the command taken from here.

Due to using prometheus on osx through docker, we need some workarounds to connect through the app

sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 172.16.222.111

We can use directly docker

docker run -v /path/to/prometheus.yaml:/etc/prometheus/prometheus.yml -p 9090:9090 --add-host="my.local.machine:172.16.222.111" prom/prometheus

By doing the above we shall be able to interact with our local application from inside the docker image.

So if we navigate to http://localhost:9090/graph we shall be greeted with our prometheus screen.
Also inside our prometheus container we are also able to communicate to our application which shall run locally.

So let’s give some time and see if the data has been collected. Then let’s go to prometheus status page http://localhost:9090/status.

We shall be greeted by the JVM information of our application.

On the next blog we shall focus on securing our prometheus endpoints.

Spring Boot and Micrometer with Prometheus Part 4: The base project

In previous posts we had a look on Spring Micrometer and InfluxDB. So you are gonna ask me why prometheus.
The reason is that prometheus is operating on a pull model vs the push model of InfluxDB.

This means that if you use micrometer with InfluxDB you are definitely going to have some overhead on pushing the results to the database as well as it is one extra pain point to make the InfluxDB database always there available to handle all the requests.

So what if instead of pushing the data, use another tool in order to pull data from the applications?
This is one of the things you can get by using Prometheus. By using prometheus you ask for the data from the application, you don’t have to receive the data.

So what we are going to do is to use exactly the same project we used on the first tutorial.

The only changes needed shall be on the applicaiton.yaml as well as the pom.xml

We shall start from pom.xml and add the micrometer binary for prometheus.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
	<modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

	<parent>
		<groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
		<artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
		<version>2.2.4.RELEASE</version>
	</parent>

	<groupId>com.gkatzioura</groupId>
	<artifactId>spring-prometheus-micrometer</artifactId>
	<version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>

	<properties>
		<micrometer.version>1.3.2</micrometer.version>
	</properties>

	<build>
		<defaultGoal>spring-boot:run</defaultGoal>
		<plugins>
			<plugin>
				<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
				<artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
				<configuration>
					<source>8</source>
					<target>8</target>
				</configuration>
			</plugin>
			<plugin>
				<groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
				<artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
			</plugin>
		</plugins>
	</build>

	<dependencies>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
			<artifactId>spring-boot-starter-webflux</artifactId>
		</dependency>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
			<artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
		</dependency>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>io.micrometer</groupId>
			<artifactId>micrometer-core</artifactId>
			<version>${micrometer.version}</version>
		</dependency>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>io.micrometer</groupId>
			<artifactId>micrometer-registry-prometheus</artifactId>
			<version>${micrometer.version}</version>
		</dependency>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>org.projectlombok</groupId>
			<artifactId>lombok</artifactId>
			<version>1.18.12</version>
			<scope>provided</scope>
		</dependency>
	</dependencies>
</project>

Then we shall add application.yaml which enables prometheus.

management:
endpoints:
web:
exposure:
include: prometheus

So now we are ready to run the application.

> mvn spring-boot:run

If we try to access actuator we are gonna be presented with the prometheus endpoint.

> curl http://localhost:8080/actuator
{
  "_links": {
    "self": {
      "href": "http://localhost:8080/actuator",
      "templated": false
    },
    "prometheus": {
      "href": "http://localhost:8080/actuator/prometheus",
      "templated": false
    }
  }
}

This “http://localhost:8080/actuator/prometheus&#8221; is the endpoint that our prometheus server would use to pull data.
So our prometheus server needs to be configured to access these data exposed by that endpoint.

On the next blog we shall deploy prometheus and view some metrics.

Spring Boot and Micrometer with InlfuxDB Part 2: Adding InfluxDB

Since we added our base application it is time for us to spin up an InfluxDB instance.

We shall follow a previous tutorial and add a docker instance.

docker run –rm -p 8086:8086 –name influxdb-local influxdb

Time to add the micrometer InfluxDB dependency on our pom

<dependencies>
...
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>io.micrometer</groupId>
            <artifactId>micrometer-core</artifactId>
            <version>1.3.2</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>io.micrometer</groupId>
            <artifactId>micrometer-registry-influx</artifactId>
            <version>1.3.2</version>
        </dependency>
...
</dependencies>

Time to add the configuration through the application.yaml

management:
  metrics:
    export:
      influx:
        enabled: true
        db: devjobsapi
        uri: http://127.0.0.1:8086
  endpoints:
    web:
      expose: "*"

Let’s spin up our application and do some requests.
After some time we can check the database and the data contained.

docker exec -it influxdb-local influx
> SHOW DATABASES;
name: databases
name
----
_internal
devjobsapi
> use devjobsapi
Using database devjobsapi
> SHOW MEASUREMENTS
name: measurements
name
----
http_server_requests
jvm_buffer_count
jvm_buffer_memory_used
jvm_buffer_total_capacity
jvm_classes_loaded
jvm_classes_unloaded
jvm_gc_live_data_size
jvm_gc_max_data_size
jvm_gc_memory_allocated
jvm_gc_memory_promoted
jvm_gc_pause
jvm_memory_committed
jvm_memory_max
jvm_memory_used
jvm_threads_daemon
jvm_threads_live
jvm_threads_peak
jvm_threads_states
logback_events
process_cpu_usage
process_files_max
process_files_open
process_start_time
process_uptime
system_cpu_count
system_cpu_usage
system_load_average_1m

That’s pretty awesome. Let’s check the endpoints accessed.

> SELECT*FROM http_server_requests;
name: http_server_requests
time                count exception mean        method metric_type outcome status sum         upper       uri
----                ----- --------- ----        ------ ----------- ------- ------ ---         -----       ---
1582586157093000000 1     None      252.309331  GET    histogram   SUCCESS 200    252.309331  252.309331  /actuator
1582586157096000000 0     None      0           GET    histogram   SUCCESS 200    0           2866.531375 /jobs/github/{page}

Pretty great! The next step would be to visualise those metrics.

Spring Boot and Micrometer with InlfuxDB Part 1: The base project

To those who follow this blog it’s no wonder that I tend to use InfluxDB a lot. I like the fact that it is a real single purpose database (time series) with many features and also comes with enterprise support.

Spring is also one of the tools of my choice.
Thus in this blog we shall integrate spring with micrometer and InfluxDB.

Our application will be a rest api for jobs.
Initially it will fetch the Jobs from Github’s job api as shown here.

Let’s start with a pom

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>2.2.4.RELEASE</version>
    </parent>

    <groupId>com.gkatzioura</groupId>
    <artifactId>DevJobsApi</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>

    <build>
        <defaultGoal>spring-boot:run</defaultGoal>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <configuration>
                    <source>8</source>
                    <target>8</target>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>

    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-webflux</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.projectlombok</groupId>
            <artifactId>lombok</artifactId>
            <version>1.18.12</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
   </dependencies>
</project>

Let’s add the Job Repository for GitHub.

package com.gkatzioura.jobs.repository;

import java.util.List;

import org.springframework.http.HttpMethod;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Repository;
import org.springframework.web.reactive.function.client.WebClient;

import com.gkatzioura.jobs.model.Job;

import reactor.core.publisher.Mono;

@Repository
public class GitHubJobRepository {

    private WebClient githubClient;

    public GitHubJobRepository() {
        this.githubClient = WebClient.create("https://jobs.github.com");
    }

    public Mono<List<Job>> getJobsFromPage(int page) {

        return githubClient.method(HttpMethod.GET)
                           .uri("/positions.json?page=" + page)
                           .retrieve()
                           .bodyToFlux(Job.class)
                           .collectList();
    }

}

The Job model

package com.gkatzioura.jobs.model;

import lombok.Data;

@Data
public class Job {

    private String id;
    private String type;
    private String url;
    private String createdAt;
    private String company;
    private String companyUrl;
    private String location;
    private String title;
    private String description;

}

The controller

package com.gkatzioura.jobs.controller;

import java.util.List;

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.gkatzioura.jobs.model.Job;
import com.gkatzioura.jobs.repository.GitHubJobRepository;

import reactor.core.publisher.Mono;

@RestController
@RequestMapping("/jobs")
public class JobsController {

    private final GitHubJobRepository gitHubJobRepository;

    public JobsController(GitHubJobRepository gitHubJobRepository) {
        this.gitHubJobRepository = gitHubJobRepository;
    }

    @GetMapping("/github/{page}")
    private Mono<List<Job>> getEmployeeById(@PathVariable int page) {
        return gitHubJobRepository.getJobsFromPage(page);
    }

}

And last but not least the main application.

package com.gkatzioura;


import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.EnableAutoConfiguration;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.security.reactive.ReactiveSecurityAutoConfiguration;

@SpringBootApplication
@EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude = {
        ReactiveSecurityAutoConfiguration.class
})
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }
}

On the next blog we are going to integrate with InfluxDB and micrometer.

Implement custom JMeter samplers

As we proceed on different architectures and implementations the need for versatile stress testing tools rises.

Apache Jmeter is one the most well known tools when it comes to load testing. It supports many protocols such as ftp http tcp and also it can be used easily for distributed testing.

Jmeter also provides you with an easy way to create custom samplers. For example if you need to load test a http endpoint that requires a specific procedure for signing the headers then a custom sampler will come in handy.

The goal is to implement a custom sampler project which will load test a simple function.

I use gradle for this example.

group 'com.gkatzioura.jmeter'
version '1.0-SNAPSHOT'

apply plugin: 'java'

sourceCompatibility = 1.6

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}


dependencies {
    compile 'org.apache.jmeter:ApacheJMeter_java:2.11'
    compile 'org.json:json:20151123'
    testCompile group: 'junit', name: 'junit', version: '4.11'
}

task copySample(type:Copy,dependsOn:[build]) {

    copy {
        from project.buildDir.getPath()+'/libs/jmeter-sampler-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar'
        into 'pathtoyourjmeterinstallation/apache-jmeter-2.13/lib/ext/'
    }
}

I include the ApacheJMeter dependency on the project since the sampler will have to extend the AbstractJavaSamplerClient.
The copySample task will copy the jar to the lib/ext path of Jmeter where all samplers reside.

A simple function will be called by the sampler

package com.gkatzioura.jmeter;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 30/1/2016.
 */
public class FunctionalityForSampling {

    public String testFunction(String arguement1,String arguement2) throws Exception {

        if (arguement1.equals(arguement2)) {
            throw new Exception();
        }

        else return arguement1+arguement2;
    }

}

The CustomSampler class extends the AbstractJavaSamplerClient class and invokes the testFunction.
By overriding the getDefaultParameters function we can apply default parameters that can be used with the request.

package com.gkatzioura.jmeter;

import org.apache.jmeter.config.Arguments;
import org.apache.jmeter.protocol.java.sampler.AbstractJavaSamplerClient;
import org.apache.jmeter.protocol.java.sampler.JavaSamplerContext;
import org.apache.jmeter.samplers.SampleResult;
import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;

import java.io.Serializable;

/**
 * Created by gkatzioura on 30/1/2016.
 */
public class CustomSampler extends AbstractJavaSamplerClient implements Serializable {

    private static final String METHOD_TAG = "method";
    private static final String ARG1_TAG = "arg1";
    private static final String ARG2_TAG = "arg2";

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(CustomSampler.class);

    @Override
    public Arguments getDefaultParameters() {

        Arguments defaultParameters = new Arguments();
        defaultParameters.addArgument(METHOD_TAG,"test");
        defaultParameters.addArgument(ARG1_TAG,"arg1");
        defaultParameters.addArgument(ARG2_TAG,"arg2");

        return defaultParameters;
    }

    @Override
    public SampleResult runTest(JavaSamplerContext javaSamplerContext) {

        String method = javaSamplerContext.getParameter(METHOD_TAG);
        String arg1 = javaSamplerContext.getParameter(ARG1_TAG);
        String arg2 = javaSamplerContext.getParameter(ARG2_TAG);

        FunctionalityForSampling functionalityForSampling = new FunctionalityForSampling();

        SampleResult sampleResult = new SampleResult();
        sampleResult.sampleStart();

        try {
            String message = functionalityForSampling.testFunction(arg1,arg2);
            sampleResult.sampleEnd();;
            sampleResult.setSuccessful(Boolean.TRUE);
            sampleResult.setResponseCodeOK();
            sampleResult.setResponseMessage(message);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            LOGGER.error("Request was not successfully processed",e);
            sampleResult.sampleEnd();
            sampleResult.setResponseMessage(e.getMessage());
            sampleResult.setSuccessful(Boolean.FALSE);

        }

        return sampleResult;
    }

}

After compile is finished the jar created must be copied to the lib/ext directory of the JMeter installation home.
Also in case there are more dependencies that have to be imported they should also be copied to the lib path of the JMeter installation home

Once the process is complete by adding Java Sampler to a JMeter Thread Group we can choose our custom sampler.

Screenshot from 2016-01-31 01:30:06

You can also find the source code here.