Spring Boot and Micrometer with InlfuxDB Part 3: Servlets and JDBC

In the previous blog we setup a reactive application with micrometer backed with an InfluxDB.

On this tutorial we shall use our old school blocking Servlet Based Spring Stack with JDBC.
My database of choice would be postgresql. I shall use the same scripts of a previous blog post.

Thus we shall have the script that initializes the database

#!/bin/bash
set -e

psql -v ON_ERROR_STOP=1 --username "$POSTGRES_USER" --dbname "$POSTGRES_DB" <<-EOSQL
    create schema spring_data_jpa_example;

    create table spring_data_jpa_example.employee(
        id  SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
        firstname   TEXT    NOT NULL,
        lastname    TEXT    NOT NULL,
        email       TEXT    not null,
        age         INT     NOT NULL,
        salary         real,
        unique(email)
    );

    insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary)
    values ('John','Doe 1','john1@doe.com',18,1234.23);
    insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary)
    values ('John','Doe 2','john2@doe.com',19,2234.23);
    insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary)
    values ('John','Doe 3','john3@doe.com',20,3234.23);
    insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary)
    values ('John','Doe 4','john4@doe.com',21,4234.23);
    insert into spring_data_jpa_example.employee (firstname,lastname,email,age,salary)
    values ('John','Doe 5','john5@doe.com',22,5234.23);
EOSQL

The we shall have a docker compose file that contains InfluxDB, Postgres and Grafana.

version: '3.5'

services:
  influxdb:
    image: influxdb
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 8086:8086
  grafana:
    image: grafana/grafana
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 3000:3000
  postgres:
    image: postgres
    restart: always
    environment:
      POSTGRES_USER: db-user
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: your-password
      POSTGRES_DB: postgres
    ports:
      - 5432:5432
    volumes:
      - $PWD/init-db-script.sh:/docker-entrypoint-initdb.d/init-db-script.sh

Now it’s time to build our spring application starting with our maven dependencies.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>2.2.4.RELEASE</version>
    </parent>

    <groupId>com.gkatzioura</groupId>
    <artifactId>EmployeeApi</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>

    <build>
        <defaultGoal>spring-boot:run</defaultGoal>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <configuration>
                    <source>8</source>
                    <target>8</target>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>

    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.postgresql</groupId>
            <artifactId>postgresql</artifactId>
            <version>42.2.8</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>io.micrometer</groupId>
            <artifactId>micrometer-core</artifactId>
            <version>1.3.2</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>io.micrometer</groupId>
            <artifactId>micrometer-registry-influx</artifactId>
            <version>1.3.2</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.projectlombok</groupId>
            <artifactId>lombok</artifactId>
            <version>1.18.12</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
   </dependencies>
</project>

Since this is a JDBC backed dependency we shall create the entities and the repositories.

package com.gkatzioura.employee.model;

import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import javax.persistence.GenerationType;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.Table;

import lombok.Data;

@Data
@Entity
@Table(name = "employee", schema="spring_data_jpa_example")
public class Employee {

	@Id
	@Column(name = "id")
	@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
	private Long id;

	@Column(name = "firstname")
	private String firstName;

	@Column(name = "lastname")
	private String lastname;

	@Column(name = "email")
	private String email;

	@Column(name = "age")
	private Integer age;

	@Column(name = "salary")
	private Integer salary;

}

Then let’s add the Repository

package com.gkatzioura.employee.repository;

import com.gkatzioura.employee.model.Employee;
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;

public interface EmployeeRepository extends JpaRepository<Employee,Long> {
}

And the controller

package com.gkatzioura.employee.controller;

import java.util.List;

import com.gkatzioura.employee.model.Employee;
import com.gkatzioura.employee.repository.EmployeeRepository;

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController
public class EmployeeController {

	private final EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

	public EmployeeController(EmployeeRepository employeeRepository) {
		this.employeeRepository = employeeRepository;
	}

	@RequestMapping("/employee")
	public List<Employee> getEmployees() {
		return employeeRepository.findAll();
	}

}

Last but not least the Application class

package com.gkatzioura.employee;


import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;

@SpringBootApplication
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }
}

As well the configuration

spring:
  datasource:
    platform: postgres
    driverClassName: org.postgresql.Driver
    username: db-user
    password: your-password
    url: jdbc:postgresql://127.0.0.1:5432/postgres
management:
  metrics:
    export:
      influx:
        enabled: true
        db: employeeapi
        uri: http://127.0.0.1:8086
  endpoints:
    web:
      expose: "*"

Let’s try it

curl http://localhost:8080/employee

After some requests we can find the entries persisted.

docker exec -it influxdb-local influx
> SHOW DATABASES;
name: databases
name
----
_internal
employeeapi
> use employeeapi
Using database employeeapi
> SHOW MEASUREMENTS
name: measurements
name
----
hikaricp_connections
hikaricp_connections_acquire
hikaricp_connections_active
hikaricp_connections_creation
hikaricp_connections_idle
hikaricp_connections_max
hikaricp_connections_min
hikaricp_connections_pending
hikaricp_connections_timeout
hikaricp_connections_usage
http_server_requests
jdbc_connections_active
jdbc_connections_idle
jdbc_connections_max
jdbc_connections_min
jvm_buffer_count
jvm_buffer_memory_used
jvm_buffer_total_capacity
jvm_classes_loaded
jvm_classes_unloaded
jvm_gc_live_data_size
jvm_gc_max_data_size
jvm_gc_memory_allocated
jvm_gc_memory_promoted
jvm_gc_pause
jvm_memory_committed
jvm_memory_max
jvm_memory_used
jvm_threads_daemon
jvm_threads_live
jvm_threads_peak
jvm_threads_states
logback_events
process_cpu_usage
process_files_max
process_files_open
process_start_time
process_uptime
system_cpu_count
system_cpu_usage
system_load_average_1m
tomcat_sessions_active_current
tomcat_sessions_active_max
tomcat_sessions_alive_max
tomcat_sessions_created
tomcat_sessions_expired
tomcat_sessions_rejected

As you can see the metrics are a bit different from the previous example. We have jdbc connection metrics tomcat metrics and all metrics relevant to our application.
You can find the sourcecode on github.

Use local docker image on minikube.

You use Minikube and you want to run your development images that you create locally. This might seem tricky since Minikube needs to download your images from a registry however you images are being uploaded on your local registry.

In any case you can still use you local images with Minikube so let’s get started.

Before running any container let’s issue.

> eval $(minikube docker-env)

This actually reuses the docker host from Minikube for your current bash session.

See for yourself.

> minikube docker-env
export DOCKER_TLS_VERIFY="1"
export DOCKER_HOST="tcp://192.168.99.101:2376"
export DOCKER_CERT_PATH="/Users/gkatzioura/.minikube/certs"
# Run this command to configure your shell:
# eval $(minikube docker-env)

Then spin up an nginx image. Most of the commands are taken from this tutorial.

>docker run -d -p 8080:80 --name my-nginx nginx
>docker ps --filter name=my-nginx
CONTAINER ID        IMAGE               COMMAND                  CREATED             STATUS              PORTS                  NAMES
128ce006ecae        nginx               "nginx -g 'daemon of…"   13 seconds ago      Up 12 seconds       0.0.0.0:8080->80/tcp   my-nginx

Now let’s create an image from the running container.

docker commit 128ce006ecae dockerimage:version1

Then let’s run our custom image on minikube.

kubectl create deployment test-image --image=dockerimage:version1

Let’s also expose the service

kubectl expose deployment test-image --type=LoadBalancer --port=80

Let’s take to the next level and try to wget our service

> kubectl exec -it podwithbinbash /bin/bash
bash-4.4# wget test-image
Connecting to test-image (10.101.70.7:80)
index.html           100% |***********************************************************************************************************|   612  0:00:00 ETA
bash-4.4# cat index.html
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Welcome to nginx!</title>
<style>
    body {
        width: 35em;
        margin: 0 auto;
        font-family: Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif;
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Welcome to nginx!</h1>
<p>If you see this page, the nginx web server is successfully installed and
working. Further configuration is required.</p>

<p>For online documentation and support please refer to
<a href="http://nginx.org/">nginx.org</a>.<br/>
Commercial support is available at
<a href="http://nginx.com/">nginx.com</a>.</p>

<p><em>Thank you for using nginx.</em></p>
</body>
</html>

Take extra attention that the above will work only on the terminal that you executed the command

eval $(minikube docker-env)

If you want to you can just setup your bash_profile to do it for every terminal but this is up to you.
Eventually this is one of the quick ways to use you local images on Minikube and most probably there are others available.