Docker basics: Docker compose

Docker Compose is a tool that allows you to run multi-container applications. With compose we can use yaml files to configure our application’ services and then using a single command create and start all of the configured services. I use this tool a lot when it comes to local development in a microservice environment. It is also lightweight and needs just a small effort. Instead of managing how to run each service while developing you can have the environment and services needed preconfigured and focus on the service that you currently develop.

With docker compose we can configure a network for our services, volumes, mount-points, environmental variables just about everything.
To showcase this we are going to solve a problem. Our goal would be to extract data from mongodb using grafana. Grafana does not have out of the box support for MongoDB therefore we will have to use a plugin.

First step we shall create our networks. Creating a network is not necessary since your services once started will join the default network. We shall make a showcase of using custom networks. We shall have a network for backend services and a network for frontend services. Apparently network configuration can get more advanced and specify custom network drivers or even configure static addresses.

version: '3.5'

networks:
  frontend:
    name: frontend-network
  backend:
    name: backend-network
    internal: true

The backend network is going to be internal therefore there won’t be any outbound connectivity to the containers attached to it.

Then we shall setup our mongodb instance.

version: '3.5'

services:
  mongo:
    image: mongo
    restart: always
    environment:
      MONGO_INITDB_ROOT_USERNAME: ${MONGO_USER}
      MONGO_INITDB_ROOT_PASSWORD: ${MONGO_PASSWORD}
    volumes:
      - ${DB_PATH}:/data/db
    networks:
      - backend

As you see we specified a volume. Volumes can also be specified separately and attach them to a service.
Also we used environmental variables for the root account, you might as well have spotted that the password is going to be provided through environmental variables ie. MONGO_USER=root MONGO_PASSWORD=root docker-compose -f stack.yaml up. The same applies for the volume path too. You can have a more advanced configuration for volumes in your compose configuration and reference them from your service.

Our next goal is to setup the proxy server which shall be in the middle of our grafana and mongodb server. Since it needs a custom Dockerfile to create it, we shall do it through docker-compose. Compose has the capability to spin up a service by specifying the docker file.

So let’s start with the Dockerfile.

FROM node

WORKDIR /usr/src/mongografanaproxy

COPY . /usr/src/mongografanaproxy

EXPOSE 3333

RUN cd /usr/src/mongografanaproxy
RUN npm install
ENTRYPOINT ["npm","run","server"]

Then let’s add it to compose

version: '3.5'

services:
  mongo-proxy:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: ProxyDockerfile
    restart: always
    networks:
      - backend

And the same shall be done to the Grafana image that we want to use. In stead of using a ready grafana image we shall create one with the plugin preinstalled.

FROM grafana/grafana

COPY . /var/lib/grafana/plugins/mongodb-grafana

EXPOSE 3000

version: '3.5'

services:
  grafana:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: GrafanaDockerfile
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 3000:3000
    networks:
      - backend
      - frontend

Let’s wrap them all together

version: '3.5'

services:
  mongo:
    image: mongo
    restart: always
    environment:
      MONGO_INITDB_ROOT_USERNAME: ${MONGO_USER}
      MONGO_INITDB_ROOT_PASSWORD: ${MONGO_PASSWORD}
    volumes:
      - ${DB_PATH}:/data/db
    networks:
      - backend
  mongo-proxy:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: ProxyDockerfile
    restart: always
    networks:
      - backend
  grafana:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: GrafanaDockerfile
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 3000:3000
    networks:
      - backend
      - frontend
networks:
  frontend:
    name: frontend-network
  backend:
    name: backend-network
    internal: true

So let’s run them all together.

docker-compose -f stack.yaml build
MONGO_USER=root MONGO_PASSWORD=root DB_PATH=~/grafana-mongo  docker-compose -f stack.yaml up

The above can be found on github.

You might as well find the Docker Images, Docker Containers and Docker registry posts useful.

Behavioural Design Patterns: Visitor

Our last pattern of the behavioural design patterns is going to be the visitor pattern.

We use the visitor pattern when we want to make it possible to define a new operation for classes of an object structure without changing the classes.

Imagine the scenario of a software that executes http requests to an api. Most http apis out there have certain limits and allow a specific number of requests to be executed per minute. We might have different class that executes requests and also takes into consideration the business logic with regards to the apis that they interact.
In case we want to inspect those calls and print some information or persist request related information to the database the visitor pattern might be a good fit.

We will start with the visitor interface.

package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public interface Visitor {
}

This interface will not specify any methods, however interfaces which extend it will contain methods visit with specific types to visit. We do this in order to be able to have loosely coupled visitor implementations (or even composition based visitors).

Then we shall implement the visitable interface.

package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public interface Visitable {

     void accept(T visitor);

}

Based on the above we shall create our request execution classes which are visitable.

package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public class LocationRequestExecutor implements Visitable {

    private int successfulRequests = 0;
    private double requestsPerMinute = 0.0;

    public void executeRequest() {
        /**
         * Execute the request and change the successfulRequests and requestsPerMinute value
         */
    }

    @Override
    public void accept(LocationVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }

    public int getSuccessfulRequests() {
        return successfulRequests;
    }

    public double getRequestsPerMinute() {
        return requestsPerMinute;
    }

}
package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public class RouteRequestExecutor implements Visitable {

    private int successfulRequests = 0;
    private double requestsPerMinute = 0.0;

    public void executeRequest() {
        /**
         * Execute the request and change the successfulRequests and requestsPerMinute value
         */
    }

    @Override
    public void accept(RouteVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }

    public int getSuccessfulRequests() {
        return successfulRequests;
    }

    public double getRequestsPerMinute() {
        return requestsPerMinute;
    }
}

And then we shall add the visitor interfaces for these type of executors

package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public interface LocationVisitor extends Visitor {

    void visit(LocationRequestExecutor locationRequestExecutor);
}
package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public interface RouteVisitor extends Visitor {

    void visit(RouteRequestExecutor routeRequestExecutor);
}

The last step would be to create a visitor that implements the above interfaces.

package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public class RequestVisitor implements LocationVisitor, RouteVisitor {

    @Override
    public void visit(LocationRequestExecutor locationRequestExecutor) {

    }

    @Override
    public void visit(RouteRequestExecutor routeRequestExecutor) {

    }
}

So let’s put em all together.

package com.gkatzioura.design.behavioural.visitor;

public class VisitorMain {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final LocationRequestExecutor locationRequestExecutor = new LocationRequestExecutor();
        final RouteRequestExecutor routeRequestExecutor = new RouteRequestExecutor();
        final RequestVisitor requestVisitor = new RequestVisitor();

        locationRequestExecutor.accept(requestVisitor);
        routeRequestExecutor.accept(requestVisitor);
    }
}

That’s it! You can find the sourcecode on github.